Canada Heading Towards An Animal Testing Ban

I recently had a debate on WP with someone about the issue of testing cosmetics on animals. Instead of offering logical, unbiased arguments, this person eventually chose to ban my comments from their post, a pretty cowardly and insecure act from someone who claimed I lacked confidence in my position. Luckily, I’m too self-assured and angered by injustice to be silenced.

Peter Dinklage joined the #BeCrueltyFree campaign and has been associated with Cruelty Free International for the last few years.

Canada is the latest nation progressing towards a Cruelty-free ban, which would see an end to testing cosmetic products on animals. The EU brought in a ban in 2013, though many major cosmetic companies allow others to carry out animal tests on their behalf, so that they can sell their products in China, which lags behind other nations in animal welfare on this issue.

Senator Carolyn Stewart Olsen has recently introduced a bill to implement a Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, which will not only ban animal testing for cosmetics, but also prohibit the sale of imported products that have been animal-tested in other parts of the world.

Despite viable alternatives, such as artificial human skin, cosmetics are often still tested on animals, in a system that is outdated and unnecessary.

100,000 animals from around the world are blinded, poisoned and killed yearly in cosmetic tests; this includes rats, mice, hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits.

The advantages of non-animal tests are outlined by the New England Anti-Vivisection Society, and they include:

  • more reliable test results that can be safely applied to humans
  • fewer errors and miscalculations in interpreting data
  • far more cost effective
  • takes a fraction of the time to produce results
  • less hazardous waste created from dead, toxic animals, therefore more environmentally friendly.

If you want ethical products, look for the Leaping Bunny label. Boots and Superdrug offer many excellent cruelty free, inexpensive own brand products.

The Real Easter Bunnies

Spring has sprung, and, for animal shelters worldwide, that means the imminent arrival of hundreds of discarded bunnies in the weeks following Easter.

Rabbits do not obey the myths surrounding them: they don’t like to be handled by humans, they dislike being confined in cages, and, most annoyingly for homeowners, rabbits can chew through pretty much anything. They just don’t stop chewing.

When pet stores sell their Easter bunnies, the cute little creatures are small, fluffy and adorable. Hard for most parents to resist. But they grow, and, if, paired up with another rabbit, they breed. And breed and breed and breed. Like rabbits.

Many families give up on their Easter critters within weeks, and animal shelters are consequently overwhelmed. Buying Easter bunnies encourages bad breeding practices that result in a surplus of bunnies from consumers’ ill-conceived purchases.

80% of easter bunnies end up in shelters and those are the lucky ones – some families assume bunnies will be better off in the wild, so release them. However, bunnies are prey animals, and not used to the wild so they simply won’t survive.

Red Door Animal Shelter attempt to discredit the myths surrounding bunnies so consumers can make informed decisions before making an impulse purchase.